Clinical placement for aesthetic medicine

Clinical Placement – Residency Programme

We have now further developed the clinical placement methodology in creating a residency programme. The residency programme allows practitioners to work a day a week, even two in some cases if their schedule allows. As an added bonus the practitioner is also earning back their course fees. Our main goal of changing aesthetic training at its very core is very much taking shape.

New Aesthetic Medicine Training Location

Our new training location is opening in Bray on the Main Street. The first of our new training locations to provide more flexibility to our delegates while providing more convenience to our clients. Our residency programme allows you to hit the ground running, Spend time in our clinics as a practitioner, honing your skills with peer support. This really is a training game changer in aesthetic medicine. Work with the most in-demand products available, Allergan Botox® and Allergan Juvederm dermal filler while still being exposed to other products within the sector and how specific products work with specific indications.

Level 4 micro needling

A level 4 aesthetic beauty course is longer than one day

One day training courses are a scourge on the beauty and medical aesthetics industry. The more we try and elevate the sector and bring in reputable training for a publically safer sector the more it would seem newly established training companies try and cash in on the lack of education around courses in the industry.

As a simple guide, any level 4 micro-needling course is approximately 200 guided learning hours, substantially longer than one day.

ISO Aesthetic Training

Aesthetic Beauty – towards better standards

HIGHER STANDARDS IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING ARE THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF ATAI. YOU MAY HAVE HEARD US TALKING ABOUT A NEW DIRECTION IN AESTHETIC EDUCATION AND THE MENTIONING OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR STANDARDISATION (ISO). FOUNDED IN 1947 IT PROVIDES FRAMEWORKS FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE OF PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONS. ITS SOLE PURPOSE IS TO MAKE SURE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE SAFE, RELIABLE AND OF GOOD QUALITY.
Regulated qualifications provided by awarding bodies such as IQ, ITEC/VTCT, and CIBTAC provide for a quality qualification as the course has to meet a robust educational standard. However, there is no guarantee that the delivering educational institution is providing an educational experience matching the high nature of the regulated qualification. While many colleges do provide a sound education, there is no audit trail that the college is adhering to any set standard.

Level 5 Beauty Therapy Courses

Your career in aesthetic beauty – September is not that far away

ATAI has quietly been working away with Industry Qualifications (an Ofqual regulated awarding organisation) and IQ Verify (a UKAS accredited certification body), to bring about a new pathway into the aesthetics sector. After looking at all the qualifications available in the market, nothing suited learners wishing to enter the industry while bypassing traditional routes of beauty. This mismatch in the industry is highlighted by the many prospective learners who are put off from undertaking conventional qualification routes due to the lack of evidence-based qualification pathways. With so many health care professionals ‘HCPs,’ coming into the industry this also makes perfect sense.

JCCP clarify position on Botox Dermal Fillers for non-healthcare practitioners

I wrote some weeks back vested interest groups had started a campaign against the JCCP due to the ambiguous position the JCCP had in regards to Dermal Filler and Botox. While there was and is no pathway for non-healthcare professionals to study the Level 7 programme for injectables, vested interest groups used the ambiguity against the JCCP insinuating they would allow non-healthcare professionals into the register for injectables.

The JCCP has now formally clarified their position updating policy to reflect the ineligibility of non-healthcare practitioners to join the register for injectable cosmetics.

Aesthetic Medicine and Vested Interest Groups

If these vested interest groups ran a platform of we do not agree with beauty therapists administering injectable cosmetics, I doubt they would find much negativity to that position. In fact, we have been very clear about where we stand on the subject. However, running a platform directly against an initiative promoting more effective training. Disputing the need and benefit of the Level 7 programme for injectables, and by extension against the very recommendations of the Keogh report and HEE reports, is, well, beyond baffling. It is with some depressing thoughts that their entire platform is not for better outcomes for the general public, but wholly about financial protection.

Has CIDESCO missed the mark with their new certificates?

Considering the pride of place CIDESCO therapists hold within the beauty and spa therapy sector, their new qualifications would seem to be bucking where the industry is heading. As Emma, our founder wrote in Irish Beauty Magazine May/June issue. “The beauty industry today is at a curvature, with a defined split between traditional beauty salon treatments and medical device-led aesthetic therapies becoming more pronounced.”